Peasant Loaf

Glow In The Dark Roads Make Debut In Netherlands
they’ve been described as fairy tale like. They’re created by mixing a photo luminescent powder in with the paint that glows in the dark for up to 10 hours after charging in the daylight. 

Light-absorbing glow-in-the-dark road markings have replaced streetlights on a 500m stretch of highway in the Netherlands. Studio Roosegaarde promised us the design back in 2012, and after cutting through rather a lot of government red tape we can finally see the finished product. One Netherlands news report said, “It looks like you are driving through a fairytale,” which pretty much sums up this extraordinary project. The design studio like to bring technology and design to the real world, with practical and beautiful results.

The glow in the dark design also includes weather warnings, they appear at certain temperature levels. It makes sense to utilize technology like this to warn about upcoming hazardous road conditions, it will probably end up saving some lives. 
sourceGlow In The Dark Roads Make Debut In Netherlands
they’ve been described as fairy tale like. They’re created by mixing a photo luminescent powder in with the paint that glows in the dark for up to 10 hours after charging in the daylight. 

Light-absorbing glow-in-the-dark road markings have replaced streetlights on a 500m stretch of highway in the Netherlands. Studio Roosegaarde promised us the design back in 2012, and after cutting through rather a lot of government red tape we can finally see the finished product. One Netherlands news report said, “It looks like you are driving through a fairytale,” which pretty much sums up this extraordinary project. The design studio like to bring technology and design to the real world, with practical and beautiful results.

The glow in the dark design also includes weather warnings, they appear at certain temperature levels. It makes sense to utilize technology like this to warn about upcoming hazardous road conditions, it will probably end up saving some lives. 
sourceGlow In The Dark Roads Make Debut In Netherlands
they’ve been described as fairy tale like. They’re created by mixing a photo luminescent powder in with the paint that glows in the dark for up to 10 hours after charging in the daylight. 

Light-absorbing glow-in-the-dark road markings have replaced streetlights on a 500m stretch of highway in the Netherlands. Studio Roosegaarde promised us the design back in 2012, and after cutting through rather a lot of government red tape we can finally see the finished product. One Netherlands news report said, “It looks like you are driving through a fairytale,” which pretty much sums up this extraordinary project. The design studio like to bring technology and design to the real world, with practical and beautiful results.

The glow in the dark design also includes weather warnings, they appear at certain temperature levels. It makes sense to utilize technology like this to warn about upcoming hazardous road conditions, it will probably end up saving some lives. 
source

Glow In The Dark Roads Make Debut In Netherlands

they’ve been described as fairy tale like. They’re created by mixing a photo luminescent powder in with the paint that glows in the dark for up to 10 hours after charging in the daylight. 


Light-absorbing glow-in-the-dark road markings have replaced streetlights on a 500m stretch of highway in the Netherlands. 
Studio Roosegaarde promised us the design back in 2012, and after cutting through rather a lot of government red tape we can finally see the finished product. 
One Netherlands news report said, “It looks like you are driving through a fairytale,” which pretty much sums up this extraordinary project. The design studio like to bring technology and design to the real world, with practical and beautiful results.

The glow in the dark design also includes weather warnings, they appear at certain temperature levels. It makes sense to utilize technology like this to warn about upcoming hazardous road conditions, it will probably end up saving some lives. 

source


fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Vortex rings are wonderful at maintaining coherent vorticity while moving over significant distances. If you stand several meters from a foam cup and try blowing to knock it over, it’s not likely to budge. But move the air impulsively with a vortex cannon, and you can knock it over from the opposite side of the room. The same principle works underwater with added visual effect. Here an impulsive burst of air exhaled by the diver forms a bubble ring with vorticity strong enough to knock over a stack of rocks. It may look like a superpower, but this is science! Dolphins and whales are also known to play with this trick. For the non-scuba-divers among you, it’s also possible to learn to do it in a swimming pool. (Video credit: DjDeutchTv; h/t to coolsciencegifs)


Liquid ‘waves’ detected on Saturn’s moon Titan
PTI | London | Updated: Mar 19 2014, 14:47 IST Scientists have detected the first liquid waves on the surface of another world after they found telltale signs of isolated rippling in a sea on Saturn’s moon Titan. The signature of isolated ripples was observed in the 380-km wide sea on Titan called Punga Mare. Unlike Earth’s waves of water, the seas on Titan are composed of hydrocarbons such as ethane and methane. These exist in their liquid state on Titan, where the surface temperature averages about -180C.The new findings were discussed by planetary scientist Jason Barnes, of the University of Idaho in US, at the 45th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), which was held in Texas. Titan is a bizarre, looking-glass version of Earth with a substantial atmosphere and a seasonal cycle. Wind and rain shape the surface to form river channels, seas, dunes and shorelines. The vast majority of Titan’s lakes and seas are concentrated around the north polar region. Just one of these bodies of liquid - Ligeia Mare - is estimated to contain about 9,000 cubic km of mostly liquid methane, equating to about 40 times the proven reserves of oil and gas on Earth. An image of Titan’s north pole taken by the Cassini probe during a flyby in July 2012 shows sunlight being reflected from surface liquid in much the same way as a mirror re-directs light. This phenomenon is known as a specular reflection, ‘BBC News’ reported. Barnes used a mathematical model to investigate whether the features in the image were compatible with waves. "We think we’ve found the first waves outside the Earth," he said. View Larger

Liquid ‘waves’ detected on Saturn’s moon Titan


PTI | London | Updated: Mar 19 2014, 14:47 IST 

Scientists have detected the first liquid waves on the surface of another world after they found telltale signs of isolated rippling in a sea on Saturn’s moon Titan. 

The signature of isolated ripples was observed in the 380-km wide sea on Titan called Punga Mare. 

Unlike Earth’s waves of water, the seas on Titan are composed of hydrocarbons such as ethane and methane. These exist in their liquid state on Titan, where the surface temperature averages about -180C.

The new findings were discussed by planetary scientist Jason Barnes, of the University of Idaho in US, at the 45th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC), which was held in Texas. 

Titan is a bizarre, looking-glass version of Earth with a substantial atmosphere and a seasonal cycle. Wind and rain shape the surface to form river channels, seas, dunes and shorelines. 

The vast majority of Titan’s lakes and seas are concentrated around the north polar region. Just one of these bodies of liquid - Ligeia Mare - is estimated to contain about 9,000 cubic km of mostly liquid methane, equating to about 40 times the proven reserves of oil and gas on Earth. 

An image of Titan’s north pole taken by the Cassini probe during a flyby in July 2012 shows sunlight being reflected from surface liquid in much the same way as a mirror re-directs light. This phenomenon is known as a specular reflection, ‘BBC News’ reported. 

Barnes used a mathematical model to investigate whether the features in the image were compatible with waves. 
"We think we’ve found the first waves outside the Earth," he said.

Graphene contact lenses could give you Predator-vision
The first room-temperature light detector that can sense the full infrared spectrum has the potential to put heat vision technology into a contact lens. 
Unlike comparable mid- and far-infrared detectors currently on the market, the detector developed by University of Michigan engineering researchers doesn’t need bulky cooling equipment to work. "We can make the entire design super-thin," said Zhaohui Zhong, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science. "It can be stacked on a contact lens or integrated with a cell phone."
Thermal vision: Graphene light detector first to span infrared spectrum 

To make the device, they put an insulating barrier layer between two graphene sheets. The bottom layer had a current running through it. When light hit the top layer, it freed electrons, creating positively charged holes. Then, the electrons used a quantum mechanical trick to slip through the barrier and into the bottom layer of graphene. The positively charged holes, left behind in the top layer, produced an electric field that affected the flow of electricity through the bottom layer. By measuring the change in current, the team could deduce the brightness of the light hitting the graphene. The new approach allowed the sensitivity of a room-temperature graphene device to compete with that of cooled mid-infrared detectors for the first time

Also, Bill Gates is funding graphene to be integrated in future condoms for super ultra thin.   WooHoo future!!Graphene contact lenses could give you Predator-vision
The first room-temperature light detector that can sense the full infrared spectrum has the potential to put heat vision technology into a contact lens. 
Unlike comparable mid- and far-infrared detectors currently on the market, the detector developed by University of Michigan engineering researchers doesn’t need bulky cooling equipment to work. "We can make the entire design super-thin," said Zhaohui Zhong, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science. "It can be stacked on a contact lens or integrated with a cell phone."
Thermal vision: Graphene light detector first to span infrared spectrum 

To make the device, they put an insulating barrier layer between two graphene sheets. The bottom layer had a current running through it. When light hit the top layer, it freed electrons, creating positively charged holes. Then, the electrons used a quantum mechanical trick to slip through the barrier and into the bottom layer of graphene. The positively charged holes, left behind in the top layer, produced an electric field that affected the flow of electricity through the bottom layer. By measuring the change in current, the team could deduce the brightness of the light hitting the graphene. The new approach allowed the sensitivity of a room-temperature graphene device to compete with that of cooled mid-infrared detectors for the first time

Also, Bill Gates is funding graphene to be integrated in future condoms for super ultra thin.   WooHoo future!!

Graphene contact lenses could give you Predator-vision

The first room-temperature light detector that can sense the full infrared spectrum has the potential to put heat vision technology into a contact lens. 


Unlike comparable mid- and far-infrared detectors currently on the market, the detector developed by University of Michigan engineering researchers doesn’t need bulky cooling equipment to work. 

"We can make the entire design super-thin," said Zhaohui Zhong, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science. "It can be stacked on a contact lens or integrated with a cell phone."

Thermal vision: Graphene light detector first to span infrared spectrum 

To make the device, they put an insulating barrier layer between two graphene sheets. The bottom layer had a current running through it. When light hit the top layer, it freed electrons, creating positively charged holes. Then, the electrons used a quantum mechanical trick to slip through the barrier and into the bottom layer of graphene. 

The positively charged holes, left behind in the top layer, produced an electric field that affected the flow of electricity through the bottom layer. By measuring the change in current, the team could deduce the brightness of the light hitting the graphene. The new approach allowed the sensitivity of a room-temperature graphene device to compete with that of cooled mid-infrared detectors for the first time

Also, Bill Gates is funding graphene to be integrated in future condoms for super ultra thin.   WooHoo future!!


Immortality? - Revolutionary membrane can keep your heart beating perfectly forever

You’re looking at a rabbit’s heart beating outside the animal that once hosted it. It’s alive, pumping blood on its own thanks to a revolutionary electronic membrane that may save your life by keeping your heart beating at a perfect rate. The thin, circuit-lined stretchable membrane has been developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis and may arrive to human hearts in 10 to 15 years.

They custom made it to precisely fit the shape of the rabbit’s heart: First, while the rabbit was still alive, they scanned it and created a 3D model using computer aided tomography. They manufactured the model in a 3D printer, which they used as a mold to create the membrane. After that they took the heart out, applied the membrane, and kept it beating at a perfect pace. 

And..  even more!
But this artificial pericardium is instrumented with high quality, man-made devices that can sense and interact with the heart in different ways that are relevant to clinical cardiology. When it senses such a catastrophic event as a heart attack or arrhythmia, it can also apply a high definition therapy. So it can apply stimuli, electrical stimuli, from different locations on the device in an optimal fashion to stop this arrhythmia and prevent sudden cardiac death.
http://sploid.gizmodo.com/revolutionary-membrane-can-keep-your-heart-beating-perf-1534678803?utm_campaign=socialflow_gizmodo_facebook&utm_source=gizmodo_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow Immortality? - Revolutionary membrane can keep your heart beating perfectly forever

You’re looking at a rabbit’s heart beating outside the animal that once hosted it. It’s alive, pumping blood on its own thanks to a revolutionary electronic membrane that may save your life by keeping your heart beating at a perfect rate. The thin, circuit-lined stretchable membrane has been developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis and may arrive to human hearts in 10 to 15 years.

They custom made it to precisely fit the shape of the rabbit’s heart: First, while the rabbit was still alive, they scanned it and created a 3D model using computer aided tomography. They manufactured the model in a 3D printer, which they used as a mold to create the membrane. After that they took the heart out, applied the membrane, and kept it beating at a perfect pace. 

And..  even more!
But this artificial pericardium is instrumented with high quality, man-made devices that can sense and interact with the heart in different ways that are relevant to clinical cardiology. When it senses such a catastrophic event as a heart attack or arrhythmia, it can also apply a high definition therapy. So it can apply stimuli, electrical stimuli, from different locations on the device in an optimal fashion to stop this arrhythmia and prevent sudden cardiac death.
http://sploid.gizmodo.com/revolutionary-membrane-can-keep-your-heart-beating-perf-1534678803?utm_campaign=socialflow_gizmodo_facebook&utm_source=gizmodo_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow Immortality? - Revolutionary membrane can keep your heart beating perfectly forever

You’re looking at a rabbit’s heart beating outside the animal that once hosted it. It’s alive, pumping blood on its own thanks to a revolutionary electronic membrane that may save your life by keeping your heart beating at a perfect rate. The thin, circuit-lined stretchable membrane has been developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis and may arrive to human hearts in 10 to 15 years.

They custom made it to precisely fit the shape of the rabbit’s heart: First, while the rabbit was still alive, they scanned it and created a 3D model using computer aided tomography. They manufactured the model in a 3D printer, which they used as a mold to create the membrane. After that they took the heart out, applied the membrane, and kept it beating at a perfect pace. 

And..  even more!
But this artificial pericardium is instrumented with high quality, man-made devices that can sense and interact with the heart in different ways that are relevant to clinical cardiology. When it senses such a catastrophic event as a heart attack or arrhythmia, it can also apply a high definition therapy. So it can apply stimuli, electrical stimuli, from different locations on the device in an optimal fashion to stop this arrhythmia and prevent sudden cardiac death.
http://sploid.gizmodo.com/revolutionary-membrane-can-keep-your-heart-beating-perf-1534678803?utm_campaign=socialflow_gizmodo_facebook&utm_source=gizmodo_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 

Immortality? - Revolutionary membrane can keep your heart beating perfectly forever

You’re looking at a rabbit’s heart beating outside the animal that once hosted it. It’s alive, pumping blood on its own thanks to a revolutionary electronic membrane that may save your life by keeping your heart beating at a perfect rate. 

The thin, circuit-lined stretchable membrane has been developed by scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Washington University in St. Louis and may arrive to human hearts in 10 to 15 years.



They custom made it to precisely fit the shape of the rabbit’s heart: First, while the rabbit was still alive, they scanned it and created a 3D model using computer aided tomography. They manufactured the model in a 3D printer, which they used as a mold to create the membrane. After that they took the heart out, applied the membrane, and kept it beating at a perfect pace. 

And..  even more!

But this artificial pericardium is instrumented with high quality, man-made devices that can sense and interact with the heart in different ways that are relevant to clinical cardiology. 

When it senses such a catastrophic event as a heart attack or arrhythmia, it can also apply a high definition therapy. So it can apply stimuli, electrical stimuli, from different locations on the device in an optimal fashion to stop this arrhythmia and prevent sudden cardiac death.

http://sploid.gizmodo.com/revolutionary-membrane-can-keep-your-heart-beating-perf-1534678803?utm_campaign=socialflow_gizmodo_facebook&utm_source=gizmodo_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow 


news.discovery.com… 
Given their sleek ways, cats have long been a symbol of mysticism, and now the reputation gets a boost from new research that finds common house cats see things that are invisible to us. Everything from psychedelic stripes on flowers to flashy patterned feathers on birds are likely detectable by cats and certain other animals, while humans remain oblivious to such things. We are also — perhaps luckily — missing out on seeing a whole world of urine markers blanketing the landscape. The secret behind the feline vision “superpower” is ultraviolet light (UV) detection. A new paper, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, found that cats, dogs and certain other animals see this form of light that is usually invisible to humans. 
Apparently cats and dogs can see ultraviolet light that the human eye cannot detect. In the study, scientists took the eyes from a variety of deceased animals and measured how much light could pass through the lens into the retinas. What they found was that dogs, cats, ferrets, and a couple other animals have lenses that allow ultraviolet light to pass through them. 
www.livescience.com… View Larger

news.discovery.com… 



Given their sleek ways, cats have long been a symbol of mysticism, and now the reputation gets a boost from new research that finds common house cats see things that are invisible to us. 

Everything from psychedelic stripes on flowers to flashy patterned feathers on birds are likely detectable by cats and certain other animals, while humans remain oblivious to such things. We are also — perhaps luckily — missing out on seeing a whole world of urine markers blanketing the landscape. 

The secret behind the feline vision “superpower” is ultraviolet light (UV) detection. A new paper, published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, found that cats, dogs and certain other animals see this form of light that is usually invisible to humans. 



Apparently cats and dogs can see ultraviolet light that the human eye cannot detect. 

In the study, scientists took the eyes from a variety of deceased animals and measured how much light could pass through the lens into the retinas. What they found was that dogs, cats, ferrets, and a couple other animals have lenses that allow ultraviolet light to pass through them. 

www.livescience.com…


Artist Daniel Rozin specializes in interactive digital art.  His work very often uses computers and software in conjunction with sculptures.  However, it is his work’s interaction with viewers that is at the center of his art.  His series of “mirrors” illustrates this point.  These interactive sculptures “reflect” the image of viewers standing in front of it using a variety of materials.  This first mirror, for example, uses a variously shaded weave pattern.  Others use wooden pegs, rusted metal, fans, and even pieces of garbage.  The individual pieces of each mirror alter their position in order to replicate and create an image of each viewer.
http://hifructose.com/2014/02/07/interactive-sculptures-become-high-tech-mirrors-by-daniel-rozin/Artist Daniel Rozin specializes in interactive digital art.  His work very often uses computers and software in conjunction with sculptures.  However, it is his work’s interaction with viewers that is at the center of his art.  His series of “mirrors” illustrates this point.  These interactive sculptures “reflect” the image of viewers standing in front of it using a variety of materials.  This first mirror, for example, uses a variously shaded weave pattern.  Others use wooden pegs, rusted metal, fans, and even pieces of garbage.  The individual pieces of each mirror alter their position in order to replicate and create an image of each viewer.
http://hifructose.com/2014/02/07/interactive-sculptures-become-high-tech-mirrors-by-daniel-rozin/Artist Daniel Rozin specializes in interactive digital art.  His work very often uses computers and software in conjunction with sculptures.  However, it is his work’s interaction with viewers that is at the center of his art.  His series of “mirrors” illustrates this point.  These interactive sculptures “reflect” the image of viewers standing in front of it using a variety of materials.  This first mirror, for example, uses a variously shaded weave pattern.  Others use wooden pegs, rusted metal, fans, and even pieces of garbage.  The individual pieces of each mirror alter their position in order to replicate and create an image of each viewer.
http://hifructose.com/2014/02/07/interactive-sculptures-become-high-tech-mirrors-by-daniel-rozin/Artist Daniel Rozin specializes in interactive digital art.  His work very often uses computers and software in conjunction with sculptures.  However, it is his work’s interaction with viewers that is at the center of his art.  His series of “mirrors” illustrates this point.  These interactive sculptures “reflect” the image of viewers standing in front of it using a variety of materials.  This first mirror, for example, uses a variously shaded weave pattern.  Others use wooden pegs, rusted metal, fans, and even pieces of garbage.  The individual pieces of each mirror alter their position in order to replicate and create an image of each viewer.
http://hifructose.com/2014/02/07/interactive-sculptures-become-high-tech-mirrors-by-daniel-rozin/Artist Daniel Rozin specializes in interactive digital art.  His work very often uses computers and software in conjunction with sculptures.  However, it is his work’s interaction with viewers that is at the center of his art.  His series of “mirrors” illustrates this point.  These interactive sculptures “reflect” the image of viewers standing in front of it using a variety of materials.  This first mirror, for example, uses a variously shaded weave pattern.  Others use wooden pegs, rusted metal, fans, and even pieces of garbage.  The individual pieces of each mirror alter their position in order to replicate and create an image of each viewer.
http://hifructose.com/2014/02/07/interactive-sculptures-become-high-tech-mirrors-by-daniel-rozin/

Artist Daniel Rozin specializes in interactive digital art.  His work very often uses computers and software in conjunction with sculptures.  However, it is his work’s interaction with viewers that is at the center of his art.  His series of “mirrors” illustrates this point.  These interactive sculptures “reflect” the image of viewers standing in front of it using a variety of materials.  This first mirror, for example, uses a variously shaded weave pattern.  Others use wooden pegs, rusted metal, fans, and even pieces of garbage.  The individual pieces of each mirror alter their position in order to replicate and create an image of each viewer.

http://hifructose.com/2014/02/07/interactive-sculptures-become-high-tech-mirrors-by-daniel-rozin/